Self-Assessment of Sleep Survey (SASS & SASS-Y)

The Whole Week Self-Assessment of Sleep Survey (SASS) and Split Week SASS (SASS-Y) are essentially retrospective questionnaire versions of a prospective sleep diary. Both have stronger correlations with sleep diary than the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (Buysse et al., 1989). The SASS-Y has double the number of questions, but demonstrated stronger correlations with prospective sleep diaries and slightly less biased compared to SASS for TWAK, SOL, SE, and QUAL. However, the SASS resulted in slightly less bias for TST and WASO compared to SASS-Y.

Reference:

Dietch, J.R., Sethi, K., Slavish, D.C., & Taylor, D.J. (2019). Validity of two retrospective questionnaire versions of the Consensus Sleep Diary: The whole week and split week Self-Assessment of Sleep Surveys. Sleep Medicine, 63, 127-136. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2019.05.015

Abstract

Objective/Background

Prospective, daily sleep diaries are the gold standard for assessing subjective sleep but are not always feasible for cross-sectional or epidemiological studies. The current study examined psychometric properties of two retrospective questionnaire versions of the Consensus Sleep Diary.

Participants/Methods

College students (N = 131, mean age = 19.39 ± 1.65; 73% female) completed seven days of prospective sleep diaries then were randomly assigned to complete either the Self-Assessment of Sleep Survey (SASS), which assessed past week sleep (n = 70), or the SASS-Split (SASS-Y), which assessed weekday/weekend sleep separately (n = 61). Participants also completed psychosocial/sleep questionnaires including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Sleep parameters derived from SASS, SASS-Y, PSQI, and sleep diaries was assessed via Bland Altman plots, limits of agreement, mean differences, and correlations.

Results

SASS-Y demonstrated stronger correlations with prospective sleep diaries and slightly less biased estimates (r = .51 to .85, α = -0.43 to 1.70) compared to SASS (r = .29 to .84, α = -1.63 to 2.33) for TWAK, SOL, SE, and QUAL. SASS resulted in slightly less bias for TST and WASO (α = -0.65 and 0.93, respectively) compared to SASS-Y (α = 14.90 and 1.05, respectively). SASS and SASS-Y demonstrated greater convergence with sleep diary than PSQI.

Conclusions

Results demonstrate good psychometric properties for the SASS and SASS-Y. When prospective sleep diaries are not feasible, the SASS and SASS-Y are acceptable substitutes to retrospectively estimate sleep parameters. Retrospective estimation of sleep parameters separately for weekdays/weekends may offer advantages compared to whole week estimation.

Access

Get the SASS and SASS-Y here.

Conditions of Use 

Students, clinicians, non-funded users: These measures are free for personal and individual clinical use. Commercial users, healthcare organizations, funded users: Please contact Daniel Taylor, Ph.D. (DanielJTaylor@email.arizona.edu) for permission and licensing information.